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BUSAN, South Korea -- The 1980s were a revolutionary time for the music industry. A major element in this revolution was the emergence of the music video. MTV (launched in 1981) was called 'illustrated radio' and a 'subliminal fashion show' by its detractors, who complained that it elevated image over music. Daryl Hall, of the pop duo Hall and Oates, said that 'the visual has begun to overpower the music.'

Groovin` to the 80`s this Weekend at Vinyl Underground


BUSAN, South Korea — The 1980s were a revolutionary time for the music industry. A major element in this revolution was the emergence of the music video. MTV (launched in 1981) was called ‘illustrated radio’ and a ‘subliminal fashion show’ by its detractors, who complained that it elevated image over music. Daryl Hall, of the pop duo Hall and Oates, said that ‘the visual has begun to overpower the music.’

But music videos helped to revive an industry that was in decline at the end of the ’70s, when music revenues plunged 10 percent in a single year. In order to compete with MTV, radio also began playing a wider variety of music and the two helped to expose many of the fledgling musical sub-genres. New developments and increased affordability in music technology (namely the synthesizer, drum machines and sampler) helped birth an explosion of electronic genres including house, techno, electro, synth-pop and new wave. Music would never be the same.

‘When a majority people think about the ’80s, they think of asymmetrical haircuts, spandex and cheesy music. But you have to remember, this is a decade when Michael Jackson, Prince and bad asses like the Clash and the Police ruled the charts,’ says Pete Neonakis, also known by his nom de guerre, Splitkick. ‘All of these pioneers broke new ground in the ’80s combining rock, punk, hip-hop, new wave and synth-based music, and creating something completely new and fresh. We’re all very excited for this new party series and can’t wait to unleash all the tracks we’ve been collecting over the years.’



For those who have attended one of Better Magic Music’s events in the past, know these are expert selectors. They have been deftly rocking crowds around the peninsula for the past four years with their well-received events like Funked Up and Souled Out, Adult Entertainment and now Physical.

Joining the Better team for the first time will be Melbourne-born performance artist and VJ savant, JUNK! After catching his eclectic one-man show at Allive’s Battle of the Bands, they decided 10 minutes into his set to bring him on board for the night. JUNK! is equal parts electronic boom-bap and zany, tongue-in-cheek golden-caped swagger. We all watched his bonkers set at Battle of the Bands with open mouths, while he jumped from jokey hip-hop to electro to sing-along karoake, recounts Andrew Wood, also know as DJ Woodreaux. He’s a very unique muscian and performer. We think the crowd will definitely enjoy his onstage shenannigans.


The festivities will start around 10 p.m. this Saturday. A cache of prizes and bottles will be awarded for best outfits and dance moves, so come correct in decade appropriate fashion. Cover is 5,000 won. Check Facebook for details.

 

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